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A few months back, we brought you word that several studios were mulling a Redbox-style delay on all new release titles. Speculation at least partially came to an end yesterday with the news that Netflix and Warner Bros. Home Entertainment had entered an agreement stipulating that Warner will continue to provide Netflix with new release titles. The caveat is that those films won’t be available to Netflix’s subscribers for 28 days following their release date.

According to Home Media Magazine, “the month-long window was chosen after sales data suggested 75% of sellthrough occurs in the first four weeks of release”. In addition, Warner will “significantly upgrade Netflix’s selection of direct-to-video titles and catalog movies available for [Netflix’s] instant streaming platform to Web-enabled TVs and computers”.

Netflix feels that the deal is a win for them because only about 30% of the company’s revenue comes from new release titles, and it stands to greatly expand its Warner catalog streaming offerings. Says company spokesperson Ken Ross:

“The way we merchandise all content available is more around connecting you with a movie you will love versus a movie that came out yesterday,”

Ted Sarandos, chief content officer for Netflix, echoed Ross’ sentiment:

“We’re able to help an important business partner meet its objectives while improving service levels for our members by acquiring substantially more units than in the past after a relatively short sellthrough window. . . At the same time, we’re able to extend the range of choices available to be streamed to our members.”

According to Michael Pachter, an analyst with Wedbush Morgan Securities, Netflix is probably paying Warner identical content costs in exchange for higher unit volumes after the delay. Says Pachter:

“If they bought 1 million copies of one title at $12 before, they will now buy 1.5 million copies for $8 and get it 28 days later,”

Pachter also feels that Blockbuster and Redbox will benefit from the deal, as it serves to level the playing field in the highly competetive DVD rental market.

Will other studios soon follow Warner’s suit, Insiders? Could we be looking at a blanket moratorioum on new release rentals in the near future? Would consumers respond to such a situation by purchasing more films, as Hollywood hopes, or are they more patient than the studios give them credit for?

[via Home Media Magazine]

60 Responses to “Netflix Agrees to 28-Day New Release Delay”

  1. Member [Join Now]
    slidecage

    sorry but pass. wont pay 18.18 a month (after tax) 3 at a time plan and have to wait a month for movies.

  2. Visitor [Join Now]
    Carson [visitor]

    Thats crazy! Why would anyone sign up for Netfilx? I would wait 28 days to use a free code at Redbox, but not Netflix…

    • Member [Join Now]
      The Turnip [the-turnip]

      Like the article says, “only about 30% of Netflix’s revenue comes from new release titles” meaning people renting new releases are not their core subscribers.

      Different people have different interests. I like new releases, but only 25% of the movies I watched last year fit that category so having Netflix allowed me access to the majority of the movies I wanted. Heck, I even got to see 13 new releases that weren’t available *anywhere* in town! No way am I giving up Netflix. In some ways any movie I haven’t seen before (no matter when it was made) is a new movie to me.

      • Member [Join Now]
        richmoral

        I don’t know about other people but it’s probably low because it’s hard enough to get the new releases from Netflix. I have a Netflix account and there has been more times when I can’t get the new release then there has been times where I can get them. My top 7 movies in que I still haven’t received and they are showing a wait. I’m thinking of even canceling my Netflix account and going with Blockbuster Online and see if I have any better luck with that. Also the list would be longer of titles with a wait but I have rented some from Redbox and some from Blockbuster already they were showing as a wait on Netflix.

        • Member [Join Now]
          The Turnip [the-turnip]

          Rich, you speak the truth – otherwise why would we two NF customers also be Redbox customers? Netflix has had long-term issues with delivering new releases quickly. There are strategies to dramatically improve that, but most people don’t know about them. (Let me know if you would like some tips.)

          Still, since Netflix’s customer base has continued to grow month after month, it also indicates that the majority of people find the long lead times acceptable. If the estimation in the article is correct that NF could now afford to buy 50% more stock due to this deal and it used to take 4 months for everyone to get their copy, it would actually reduce the time it would take to get a copy to everyone even though there is an initial delay to all. (I just threw out the 4 month number as an estimate – I have no inside information about the exact time frame.)

          I always recommend that EVERY customer of Netflix and Blockbuster should try out the other service. You will never know which one is better in your area until you try. Personally, I’ve tried Blockbuster twice and found it to be horrible. Other people in other parts of the country report the exact opposite results.

        • Member [Join Now]
          altonb1

          Don’t expect Blockbuster to fill your needs. I was originally a BB Online customer and left when they started changing terms a few years ago. The turn-around time is far slower than Netflix. Whereas Netflix will receive a movie (usually the day after I mail it) and immediately ship the next on the list, BB would seem to take 2 days to receive, 2 days to ship. In fact, most of my returns were to a BB store where the film was scanned in as returned immediately. However, it would still take 2-3 days (or longer) for that Blue envelope to show up at my door. And their availability isn’t (ot at least wasn’t) any better. I had 1 specific film at the top of my list for several months (maybe a year?) that was always listed as a wait. It never did ship the entire time I was a customer.

        • Visitor [Join Now]
          Dudeman [visitor]

          In response to “richmoral”, I had Blockbuster Online along with Netflix for four years, because Netflix doesn’t have everything. I got worse service from Blockbuster Online. Many discs had long waits, including non-new releases. My discs would come from distribution centers in the same nearby cities Netflix uses, but I don’t know if the service differs throughout the country.
          Another thing about Blockbuster Online…TV show DVDs have to be added in sets instead of individually, and if the set is “broken” or rearranged, discs might get sent out of order for some reason.

          • Visitor [Join Now]
            SeanDavid [visitor]

            Yes, I too used to have Blockbuster online. It was horrible. It still only took one day to ship back and forth, but too many movies jumped to long wait the day of their release. I am now a little over a week into my first netflix two week trial, and I like them better. However, due to getting my discs in the mail box a few minutes too late on Saturday, they were not sent back until only today, which means I lost my opportunity to get tommorrows new movies sent out today. That is the strategy. Send stuff back on Saturday. That’s it. But, as I just pointed out, it’s all too easy for that to go wrong and then you’re screwed. I will be cancelling my netflix membership after my two week trial, because while it seems GREAT for TV shows, my main concern is new release movies, and netflix doesn’t give a sh*t about customers like me. If they did they would not have agreed to a 28 day wait on Warner movies, and been so happy about it.

  3. Visitor [Join Now]
    Vernon Dent [visitor]

    Is this stupid or what?

    All this arrangement does is condition consumers to wait an average of 5 instead of 4 months for a title.

    If “75% of sellthrough occurs in the first four weeks of release” *NOW* what will happen after the new arrangement?

    Any guesses?

  4. Visitor [Join Now]
    rb [visitor]

    Actually, I think this is good for Redbox. Why you ask? Because it looks like Redbox is being forced anyway(by the studios) to go along with the 28 day wait in order to keep their rental price at $1 instead of raising it to $2. I can’t see Redbox being able to keep their price at $1 much longer while being forced to buy their dvds at retail price. Let’s face reality. At least if Netflix AND Redbox are both forced into the 28 day wait, I think people will still choose Redbox over Netflix. Not so much so if Redbox raises their prices to $2 in order to buy their dvds retail on day one of the release date. If both Redbox and Netflix agree to the 28 day wait BUT Blockbuster has the new release dvd available on day one with their $5 rental price, more customers will adjust to the 28 day wait instead of paying Blockbuster the ridiculous $5 rental price–and further bulging the pockets of the studios since the studios are in a revenue-sharing agreement with Blockbuster.

    • Visitor [Join Now]
      John Small [visitor]

      I think you would see the exact opposite to be true RB.

      If Redbox raised their price to $2.00 for the first night but they were able to get the movies on the first day, then people would happily get their new releases there instead of waiting 28 days for Netflix. Even if they lose 25% of their customers, they would still make more money.

      If Redbox has to wait 28 days, then a lot of people are going to look elsewhere for the New Releases. Redbox would lose a ton of cash and customers in this scenario. They only have to lose 2-3% of their customer base in order to be losing money. They would lose way more than that.

      Unfortunately, Warner can smell the blood in the water that this agreement signals and that bodes ill for Redbox. I’m not sure they would be able to convince Warner under any terms now to give them titles on release date.

      Redbox should have learned that you don’t bring a knife to a gunfight.

      • Visitor [Join Now]
        rb [visitor]

        See your point but my thought was based on how many bloggers on this site keep saying that they are switching over to Netflix now that Redbox can no longer guarantee them a new release on the day of the release. With Netflix now agreeing to the 28 day wait, no way will Netflix have a new release available to ANY (new or old) of their customers on day one. From what I understand, if your a new customer to Netflix, they would move mountains to make sure to ‘impress’ the new customers by sending them all the new releases right away and just letting their old customers wait, and wait, and wait. Now old and new Netflix customers have to wait at least 28 days. Therefore, makes no sense now for Redbox customers to want to switch to Netflix with the thought/argument that they can get new releases on day one from Netflix but not Redbox because Redbox has to buy their dvds retail on the day of the release. Agree with Vernon that customers, like myself, will just be ‘conditioned’ to wait an extra 28 days. I’d rather be ‘conditioned’ and save money then spend more money to get a new release on day one. Frankly, I don’t know if I’m getting a new release on day one, 28. or 30 days after it’s been released. Example, I want to see the movie “Moon” and was just told it comes to dvd on January 12th…. If the same person told me it comes to dvd on February 12th, I’d be okay with that BECAUSE I, like most rental customers, don’t really know when a movie is suppose to come out on dvd unless told by someone ‘in the know’…

        • Member [Join Now]
          The Turnip [the-turnip]

          Hey, RB – For every post here where someone is saying they are taking their business to Netflix, there is also a person on the Netflix blog saying they are moving to Redbox. It’s purely anger and emotion and not an understanding of both businesses.

          You are correct: there is a “honeymoon period” at Netflix (and Blockbuster) where the new customers get preference over established members. Also, people need to understand that a member on the $10 plan who rents one movie a month is paying $10 for each rental. The guy who pays $10 a month and rents 10 movies is paying $1 per rental. When that last copy of a movie is in a distribution center and it has to be sent to one of those people, they guy paying more per copy gets preference. People cry foul, but they simply don’t understand that a businesses would have to be run by idiots to not take care of their most profitable customers first.

          • Visitor [Join Now]
            rb [visitor]

            Not computing….If both Netflix customers are paying $10 per month then Netflix is getting $10 revenue from both customers. If both customers have the movie “The Hurt Locker” on their que/list or whatever you call it, and Netflix only has one copy of “The Hurt Locker” left, then seems to me that Netflix should send that copy to whichever customer has that movie longer/higher on their list regardless if they are a new or old customer, or regardless if they rent one or 10 movies a month. Both customers are still paying the same $10 so if the one customer who doesn’t get “The Hurt Locker” will just then be sent the next movie that that customer has on their que/list–or whatever you call it. Fact is both customers are paying $10 a month so Netflix isn’t making more or less money on either customer SINCE Netflix has thousands of movies in their category and will just send the one customer who doesn’t get “The Hurt Locker” a different movie –perhaps 10,11,12 different movies that month–until “The Hurt Locker” becomes available for that customer. So if both customers are paying $10 a month regardless, and if Netflix can just send the customer who didn’t receive “The Hurt Locker” a different movie until “T.H.L.” again becomes available, then how is Netflix making more profit on one $10 customer over another $10 customer when Netflix just reaches into their thousand dvd catalog and sends out a different dvd until the requested dvd becomes available? I’m getting way too wordy here…thinking way too much because it’s been snowing way too much and trying to find things to do indoors…..sorry….:-(

          • Member [Join Now]
            The Turnip [the-turnip]

            RB, you’re not being “too wordy” at all! : ) Yes, Netflix is getting the same $10 revenue from each customer, but in my example, the OVERHEAD to supply the high-use customer is 10 times higher so it greatly reduces the profit margin between the two.

            MEMBER A: Paid $10 this month and rented 1 movie. Shipping and overhead costs are about 80 cents for that ONE movie so that cost them 80 cents for the month. Netflix has a profit of $9.20 from that customer.

            MEMBER B: Paid the same $10 this month but rented 10 movies. Shipping and overhead costs are about 80 cents for EACH movie so it cost them $8 for the month. Netflix has a profit of $2 from that customer.

            It doesn’t matter if they are both “competing” for the same new release or a movie that is sitting on the shelf and nobody wants. No matter what, they have to spend about 80 cents EVERY time they ship a disc. Member A generates MUCH more profit for less effort than Customer B and is smart to cater to the most profitable people. (And I say that knowing that I don’t qualify for that category!)

          • Visitor [Join Now]
            rb [visitor]

            Got it now Turnip….Your explanation helped it compute in my lazy brain on this snowy evening! Wasn’t even thinking or calculating in the shipping costs for the Netflix customer who gets 10 versus the customer who gets 1 dvd per month. Was only thinking how Netflix doesn’t have to go out and spend MORE money to buy more dvds to increase their dvd supply– but just has to reach into their vast dvd catalog and send the customer a different dvd until “The Hurt Locker” (example new release) is returned by another customer and becomes available for that customer. Guess Netflix has the shipping costs factor and Redbox has the cost factor of paying the employees who have to fill and maintain their kiosks. Both companies have the high cost of customer service reps who have to handle all the phone complaints that both Netflix and Redbox customers have!! Wonder what the comparison cost is for Netflix to pay the employees who receive/send out dvds plus the additional shipping costs of the dvds, VERSUS the cost for Redbox paying its employees who fill and maintain their kiosks with dvds, plus the original cost of the kiosk machines …….

          • Visitor [Join Now]
            SeanDavid [visitor]

            This is all quite informative. But I am still a little unclear on how netflix says only 30% of revenue comes from new releases? How do they calculate that, seeing as how you don’t pay individually for specific titles, just a general monthly fee? If they are saying only 30% of CUSTOMERS rent new realeases, or that only 30% of everyones rentals are new releases, I can’t help but think that that might be, kind of, I don’t know, due to the fact that IT IS SO HARD TO GET A NEW MOVIE FROM THEM IN THE FIRST PLACE? I just keep thinking that their new realease rentals would be a lot higher if they actually had more of them.

        • Visitor [Join Now]
          The Turnip [visitor]

          Hi Sean, you are right – Netflix is NOT saying that 30% of their CUSTOMERS rent new releases; they are saying that 30% of all the DISCS they ship are new releases. I’d bet the total number of customers who rented at least ONE new release is more likely closer to 95% – 100%.

          I agree with you that their cut of the new release market would be higher if the titles didn’t take so long to get. I don’t believe it would be much higher, though, because of the comments I’ve read from Netflix & Rebox customers who are only interested in new releases. The degree of anger expressed here over having to wait just one or two days of the embargoed titles from the Big 3 gives me the impression that if a new movie is not in their hands on “Tuesday Only” that is unacceptable to them. DVD-by-mail just doesn’t fit that desire.

          • Visitor [Join Now]
            SeanDavid [visitor]

            Ohhh, I see. Thank you. But I’m now thinking that 30% of all discs shipped being new releases is a high number. Think about all the movies and shows they have in their library, and then figure what percentage of them are brand new releases. Certainly far less than 30%. So by that math (think about it a little) netflix customers actually really do care about the new ones. To take a very general, sweeping figure like that and then apply it the way they did seems self serving.
            I’d say they need to take a poll through e-mail of all their customers and add up the peoples actual opinions. If there was a bar graph showing customers opinions it would be a more accurate figure that truly represented our interests.

          • Visitor [Join Now]
            SeanDavid [visitor]

            P.S. They say only 30% of discs shipped in a given time period are new releases? Well that number WOULD absolutely be much higher if all the people that had those movies in their queue actually got them shipped to them. Going by the number of discs SHIPPED versus the number in peoples queues is a completely innaccurate way of figuring the number of people that WANT the movie and just can’t get it. So yeah, they should go by how many people have them in their queues, or take a poll. Or both.

    • Member [Join Now]
      richmoral

      That or they will switch to Blockbuster Online because it’s the same price as Netflix.

  5. Member [Join Now]
    clintec

    I’ll go back to one of my previous statements.
    90% of the movies I own, I did not see in the theatre. I will not shell out $20 at retail for a video I have not seen…. and I’m certain I’m not alone in that.

    An agreement like this will only push the sellthrough percentage way down as more people will wait to rent it before they buy it. It’s the whole TRY BEFORE YOU BUY concept.

    People will shell out $10/ticket to see something in the theatre because there is an additional entertainment value there. I just don’t envision the same level of people spending cold-hard cash blindly on a video they are unsure of.

    Maybe I’m wrong and 90% of that 75% sellthrough comes from people who have seen the movie at the theatre… I doubt it though.

    I wish both of them luck… but I’m sceptical that it will work our for Warner. It will most definitely work out for Netflix… and coo-does to them. I see Netflix’ business model switching dramatically over to online distribution of content rather than by mail. It’s faster, cheaper and less hassle for all parties involved. I just hope they have in their contract the ability for them to receive online distribution rights at the end of the 28-day period as well.

    Good Luck to them both… but I’ll pass.

  6. Visitor [Join Now]
    Robert [visitor]

    Twenty eight days give me a freaking why not just make it 60 days its not gonna change anything with the economy in its current state. How much do they really think it will increase their DVD sales over the present I for one own over a thouand videos and if their is a video I wanted in the past I would buy it however these days its rare I buy anything on the first release date due to the fact most movies these days are junk and just not worth it. How come these guys can’t figure this stuff out they could easily increase sales by lowering prices a few more percent on the new releases and make it up in volume. Oh well……..

  7. Member [Join Now]
    captmovie

    HA.. delay definitely won’t make me want to buy the movie. In fact doesn’t matter what the movie industry does. 3D, 6D whatever still not interested in buying movies.

    With a free Redbox code every month, Netflix, etc. we have movies coming out our ears.

  8. Visitor [Join Now]
    Rojas [visitor]

    I don’t get it, the studios think that if i don’t see a new movie on netflix or redbox that
    i am going to run down to Best buy or walmart to see if they have anything new
    are they joking.

  9. Member [Join Now]
    altonb1

    Yeah, their logic is flawed. I buy new release DVDs for movies I want to buy. These are generally the family-fare films, such as Disney titles. The rest are put in my Netflix queue. I remove them from NF if I end up getting it from Redbox, instead, or on the rare occasion I actually get something from Blockbuster. I now have BB Express kiosks in my area, so that is now another avenue for me to rent. But even if all of them extend the availability of new releases by a month, I’m not going to BUY a title just to have it sit on my shelf after I watch it once. I did that for far too long–and have seen quite a few of those $20 DVDs sitting in the $5 bin at Walmart a few months later. After spending a fortune on DVDs of crappy movies, I just don’t buy many at all–unless I know they are going to be quality. Disney is one distributor that rarely disappoints. Maybe the other studios should take note if they really want to see their DVD sales increase.

  10. Visitor [Join Now]
    acdahl [visitor]

    Won’t change a thing for me. I can wait an extra 28 days, if I need to. Plus, it sounds like the streaming on Netflix will increase, so I have no problems.

  11. Visitor [Join Now]
    Steve [visitor]

    I don’t mind waiting an additional 28 days as long as it’s a level playing field amongst all the DVD rentees. (I’m even OK with BlockBuster renting them right away at a higher price.)

    For me, I’m already waiting quite a while given that I didn’t splurge on seeing it in the theater. I have a long enough list of movies I want to watch that I am not in a big hurry.

  12. Visitor [Join Now]
    Dudeman [visitor]

    I don’t mind waiting for new releases from Netflix. I’m already skipping the theatrical release anyway and waiting for the video release, so waiting a bit longer (while still getting the next discs in my queue) is not nearly as annoying as continuously going to the video store to see if a copy of a new release is on the shelf. I can probably count on one hand the number of times I added a New Release when it was newly released on DVD or prior to the release.
    Maybe Netflix should apply late fees to new releases so people wouldn’t hog them and mail them back. I’ve seen people just set their online rental discs on their coffee tables or countertops and forget about them. If people want to keep movies for longer than a whole week they should just buy them.

  13. Member [Join Now]
    markwg

    TO THE PERSON THINKING OF LEAVING NETFLIX FOR BLOCKBUSTER, ALL I HAVE TO SAY IS GO AHEAD, AND YOU WILL SEE, YOU WILL GET FEWER MOVIES, THEN WITH NETFLIX, I TRIED BOTH AND THE RETURN OF BLOCKBUSTER FOR A 30 DAY PERIOD ONE AT A TIME WAS ONLY 6 MOVIES AND 2 RETURNED FOR INSTORE DISCS. NETFLIX WAS FOR ONE AT A TIME 15 MOVIES, AND NOW I GET 3 AT A TIME AND AM PLEASED.

  14. Member [Join Now]
    alans613

    I’ve had very few problems with Netflix…and the problems I have had have been minor, such as getting the wrong disc or a movie not shipping the same day as the day that my previous movie was returned(I ended up getting an extra DVD upon my next shipment). My experiences with NF customer service have been excellent.
    Who cares about waiting an extra 28 days? Most movies i’ve seen lately have sucked anyway so I can wait an extra month for another Hollywood crapfest. Let’s remember that back in the heyday of VHS rentals that most movies took 6 months, sometimes more to release to tape. Now that timespan is 4 months or less.

  15. Member [Join Now]
    amtj03

    First it is not all new releases, just from warner. Second most people who are netflix customers are not looking for new releases anyway. Redbox does not even carry 1/100 of the movies netflix does, therefore revenue will not increase for them. I do not know anyone who rents 10 movies a month from redbox. Redbox carries no indies, no tv, and gets a lot of new releases late allready. This deal will definitly screw them in the long run. That being said no entertainment-to-home service is 100% awesome. BB online is by far the worse, high wait-turn around time, less selection, and cost. While you do allready wait for netflix new releases, at least it has free streaming, old foreign films, and low cost. Redbox does not get all new releases and sometimes they lack availability. With any service there is going to be some supplementing.

    • Visitor [Join Now]
      SeanDavid [visitor]

      If I HAVE to wait 28 days from either place, I’d stick with redbox. If it was between waiting 28 days for a warner movie from netflix, or a few days for redbox to get them, I’d go with redbox. I think redbox’s shove-it-studios approach is cool in theory, but since they are now going to just plain NEVER get movies from the big three unless they made a gazzillion dollars in the box office, renting from redbox is now out of the question. They are fu*#ing up bad…that is a horrible business decision to not buy many titles at all. So, I was all in redbox’s corner up until then. Now my choices on A LOT of movies are going to be: Wait 28 days to get it from netflix, or NEVER get it from redbox. Sorry, but with that stategy, redbox loses. But netflix doesn’t win either. With the new movies being hard to get ontime already, and now the 28 day window on all warner movies, they lose too. Who wins, you ask? Nobody. CERTAINLY not the studios.

      Because of bad business decisions from every company involved, we all lose. Looks like I will be watching FAR LESS movies in the future. Thanks big business greed, you make the world a better place.

  16. Visitor [Join Now]
    Dobieman [visitor]

    ANY ONE THAT GOES OUT AND BUYS THIS MOVIES IS ONLY HURTING THEM SELFS. IF EVERYONE STOPS BUYING MOVIES THEY WILL LIFT THE DELAY, AND IF MORE PEOPLE GO OUT AND BUY THESE MOVIES THEY WILL ONLY GET MORE COMPANIES TO DO THIS DELAY AND MAYBE DELAY THEM LONGER, IT’S UP TO THE PEOPLE TO CONTROLL THIS NOT THE RICH CEO’S…

  17. Visitor [Join Now]
    jack [visitor]

    So how does BlockBusterExpress get to do the $1 KIOSK deal with new release movies while the others don’t?
    I think they are just trying to push the OnDemand market with same day releases, they are not concerned about selling them. Making new releases available to OnDemand the same day as retail. Holding out 28 days, they can pull the unsold stock of movies and recycle them to netflicks/rb/etc rather than retail eating the cost, limiting the 2 for $5 movie bin at the bargain store. Won’t be long before BlueRay will be released earlier than DVD to push the more expensive product.

    • Member [Join Now]
      The Turnip [the-turnip]

      “Won’t be long before BlueRay will be released earlier than DVD to push the more expensive product.”

      Wow, you nailed that! Toy Story 1 & 2 have been out of production for some time. The Blu-ray + DVD version will release on 3/23/10 and the “DVD only” version is rumored to release 21 days later. Unfortunately, I can’t find ANY information on the “DVD only” version to back up that claim. Maybe only the Blu+DVD combo will be offered or information will become available as the date becomes closer.

      • Visitor [Join Now]
        Joe Schmuck [visitor]

        It’s longer than 21 Days, Turnip.

        The DVD BLU-RAY combo ( for both 1 & 2) is March 23rd.

        The DVD only versions is May 11th.

        • Member [Join Now]
          The Turnip [the-turnip]

          Hey, thank you, JS! Doh, I see now where I failed in my thoroughness while researching (just didn’t scroll down quite far enough.)

          Seven weeks… not three.

          • Visitor [Join Now]
            Joe Schmuck [visitor]

            When you say scroll down, you wouldn’t be looking at VPD’s web site , would you ?

          • Member [Join Now]
            The Turnip [the-turnip]

            No, I searched for Toy Story on VideoEta. I saw a reference near the top for a 3D version (which wasn’t what I was looking for) so I went to Amazon where I found the release date for Blu-ray. Had I scrolled down further on VideoEta the first time, I would have found the answer.

            Looks like VPD is for people in the biz; I don’t qualify.

          • Visitor [Join Now]
            Joe Schmuck [visitor]

            I just thought when you said scroll down, it was eerily similiar to how VPD had it listed. The BLU-RAY combo pack was listed at the top of the listing and at the very bottom of the listing was the standard DVD only version.

          • Visitor [Join Now]
            The Turnip [visitor]

            Isn’t it weird how so many websites seem like clones? Don’t be surprised if you see “HEY JOE SCHMUCK” messages from me in all caps asking for help in finding release dates in the future due to your ninja skills! Oooh, speaking of that – have you ever heard of a release date (or even a rumor) for The Incredibles on Blu-ray?

          • Visitor [Join Now]
            Joe Schmuck [visitor]

            No news on The Incredibles BLU-RAY yet, Turnip.

          • Member [Join Now]
            The Turnip [the-turnip]

            Darn!

      • Visitor [Join Now]
        rb [visitor]

        And thank you Turnip for mentioning that you searched Toy Story on a site named VideoEta…. I never knew about this VideoEta site; checked it out since you mentioned it, and it’s very helpful noting months ahead of time when/which future month movies will be released on dvd. Of course one can only hope then which new releases Redbox will actually get :-)

  18. Member [Join Now]
    ladymary

    I bet we see a lot more illegal downloading now.

    • Member [Join Now]
      MovieWatcherSupreme [moviewatchersupreme]

      Illegal downloading quota’s are mainly a steady increase of anywhere from 20% to 40% increase per year since the start of mainstream digital media in the early 2000’s or it could be considered the late 90’s.